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WALFWAY HOUSE IN INDIANAPOLIS

Destination: Recovery

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Take Tim Out and Relax

Posted on February 10, 2019 at 10:22 AM Comments comments (4)
Life can be overwhelming at times. No wonder we have a desire to escape "reality" through drugs and alcohol. Try practicing not taking things so seriously. It sounds ridiculous, especially when we are faced with all the troubles of this world. But even by taking 5 or 10 minutes out of your day to take some deep breaths and relax, life's problems may seem less intense. Sometimes it helps to watch a funny movie. Laughter can get you outside of yourself. Be kind to yourself. We are all in a journey.

Twenty-Four Hours a Day Book

Posted on December 3, 2018 at 6:38 PM Comments comments (1)
Thought for the Day:
 
An alcoholic carries an awful load around with him. What a load lying puts on your shoulders! Drinking makes liars out of all us alcoholics. In order to get the liquor we want, we have to lie all the time. We have to lie about where we've been and what we've been doing. A man who's lying is only half alive, because of the constant fear of being found out. When you come into A.A., and get honest with yourself and with other people, that terrible load of lying falls off your shoulders. Have I got rid of that load of lying?
 
Meditation for the Day:
 
I believe that in the spiritual world, as in the material world, there is no empty space. As fears and worries and resentments depart out of my life, the things of the spirit come in to take their places. Calm comes after a storm. As soon as I am rid of fears and hate and selfishness, God's love and calm and peace can come in.
 
Prayer for the Day:
 
I pray that I may rid myself of all fears and resentments, so that peace and serenity may take their place. I pray that I may sweep my life clean of evil, so that good may come in.
 

Pulling Ourselves Out Of Issolation and Loneliness

Posted on November 18, 2018 at 7:02 PM Comments comments (0)
Alone no more.
"We gradually and carefully pull ourselves out of the isolation and loneliness of addiction and into the mainstream of life."
Basic Text, p. 37
Many of us spent much of our using time alone, avoiding other people-especially people who were not using-at all costs. After years of isolation, trying to find a place for ourselves in a bustling, sometimes boisterous fellowship is not always easy. We may still feel isolated, focusing on our differences rather than our similarities. The overwhelming feelings that often arise in early recovery-feelings of fear, anger, and mistrust-can also keep us isolated. We may feel like aliens but we must remember, the alienation is ours, not NA's.
In Narcotics Anonymous, we are offered a very special opportunity for friendship. We are brought together with people who understand us like no one else can. We are encouraged to share with these people our feelings, our problems, our triumphs, and our failures. Slowly, the recognition and identification we find in NA bridge the lonely gap of alienation in our hearts. As we've heard it said-the program works, if we let it.
Just for Today: The friendship of other members of the fellowship is a life-sustaining gift. I will reach out for the friendship that's offered in NA, and accept it.
Corresponding page Sixth Edition
Basic Text, p., 37
This is our road to spiritual growth. We change every day. We gradually and carefully pull ourselves out of the isolation and loneliness of addiction and into the mainstream of life. This growth is not the result of wishing, but of action and prayer. The main objective of Step Seven is to get out of ourselves and strive to achieve the will of our Higher Power.
If we are careless and fail to grasp the spiritual meaning of this step, we may have difficulties and stir up old troubles. One danger is in being too hard on ourselves.

A Positive Attitude

Posted on October 7, 2018 at 10:33 PM Comments comments (0)
"That old nest of negativism followed me everywhere I went."
          - Basic Text, p.137
A negative attitude is the trademark of active addiction. Everything that occurred in our lives was someone or something else's fault. We had blaming others for our shortcomings down to a fine science. In recovery, one of the first things we strive to develop is a new attitude. We find that life goes a lot easier when we replace our negative thinking with positive principles.
While a negative attitude dogged us in our active addiction, all too often it can follow us into the rooms of Narcotics Anonymous. How can we begin to adjust  our attitudes? By altering our actions. It isn't easy, but it can be done.
We can start by listening to the way we talk. Before we open our mouths, we ask ourselves some simple questions: Does what I'm going to say speak to the problem, or the solution? Is what I'm going to say framed in a kind manner? Is what I have to say important, or would everyone be just as well off if I kept my mouth shut? Am I talking just to hear myself talk, or is there some purpose to my "words of wisdom"?
Our attitudes are expressed in our actions. Often, it's not what we say, but the way we say it that really matters. As we learn to speak in a more positive manner' we will notice our attitudes improving as well.
 
Just for today: I want to be free of negativity. Today, I will speak and act positively.

Inspiration

Posted on September 25, 2018 at 11:41 AM Comments comments (0)
A shark in a fish tank will grow 8", but in the ocean it will grow 8' or more. The shark will never out grow its environment, and neither will you. Many times we're around small thinking people, so we don't grow. Change your environment and watch your growth.

Peace

Posted on September 9, 2018 at 5:19 PM Comments comments (0)
If you cannot find peace within yourself, you will never find it anywhere else.

Shame

Posted on August 12, 2018 at 4:00 PM Comments comments (1)
I'm really enjoying this IOP class I'm in. (That's a miracle) It's proving to be profoundly informative. We talked about shame tonight. I didn't realize how much shame I had, in believing that I wasn't worth the love and acceptance I've been searching for my whole life due to my abandonment issues. But talking about it and putting it in the air like this ensures that my feelings of shame won't survive. If u can name it and talk about it, shame can't survive.
 
An addict needs shame like a man dying of thirst needs salt water. -
    Terrence Real 

The Gift of Desperation

Posted on July 18, 2018 at 12:37 PM Comments comments (1)
"Our disease always resurfaced or continued to progress until, in desperation, we sought help from each other in Narcotics... Anonymous."
  - Basic Text, p. 13
When we think of being desperate, we envision an undesirable state: a poor, bedraggled soul frantically clawing at something sorely needed, a desperate look in the eyes. We think of hunted animals, hungry children, and of ourselves before we found NA.
Yet it was the desperation we felt before coming to NA that compelled us to accept the First Step. We were fresh out of ideas, and so became open to new ones. Our insanity had finally risen higher than our wall of denial, forcing us to get honest about our disease. Our best efforts at control had only worn us out; hence, we became willing to surrender. We had received the gift of desperation and, as a result, were able to accept the spiritual principles that make it possible for us to recover.
Desperation is what finally drives many of us to ask for help. Once we've reached this state, we can turn around and start anew. Just as the desperate, hunted animal seeks a safe haven, so do we: in Narcotics Anonymous.
Just for Today: The gift of desperation has helped me become honest, open-minded, and willing. I am grateful for this gift because it has made my recovery possible.
  - Corresponding page Sixth Edition
  - Basic Text, p., 13
Most of us realized that in our addiction we were slowly committing suicide, but addiction is such a cunning enemy of life that we had lost the power to do anything about it. Many of us ended up in jail, or sought help through medicine, religion and psychiatry. None of these methods was sufficient for us. Our disease always resurfaced or continued to progress until in desperation, we sought help from each other in Narcotics Anonymous.
After coming to NA we realized we were sick people. We suffered from a disease from which there is no known cure. It can, however, be arrested at some point, and recovery is then possible.
 

Addiction and Recovery

Posted on July 4, 2018 at 1:03 PM Comments comments (3)
Very, very, grateful to be here today and get to share a little bit of my story with u. Its come to my realization that my selfish pride is what's been keeping me from sharing it with u, coupled along with some shame and embarrassment. In February i relapsed and after about 6 wks my body had started to shut down. My liver, tormented from drugs and alcohol over the yrs, along with Hep C couldnt process anymore poison. On 3.21.18 i ODed and was taken to the hospital unable to b...reathe on my own...without a pulse. They called my mom in from Phoenix, told her to hurry, they didnt know if i was gonna live. After 4 days on life support i came out of it. Unable to walk or feed myself, i knew i had really fucked up this time. After a month i was released still unable to function without meds and even then im still learning and fighting to do basic normal everyday functions. I lost oxygen to my brain and now i have the fight of my life staring me square in the face in the form of rerouting the signals from my brain to my limbs and core. I know why im here today and it's to help. Im here to help other addicts and i hope my story will give anyone having any doubts some hope. Im not giving up! I have a purpose and i aim to see it through! The spirit God gave us does not make us timid, but gives us power, love, and self discipline.-Timothy Ch.1 v7

Accepting Life

Posted on June 16, 2018 at 5:10 PM Comments comments (6)
“Some things we must accept, others we can change. The wisdom to know the difference comes with growth in our spiritual program.”
Basic Text, p. 95
 
It’s relatively easy to accept the things we like—it’s the things we don’t like that are hard to accept. But remaking the world and everyone in it to suit our tastes would solve nothing. After all, the idea that the world was to blame for all our problems was the attitude that kept us using—and that attitude nearly killed us.
In the course of working the steps, we begin to ask ourselves hard questions about the roles we ourselves have played in creating the unacceptable lives we’ve lived. In most cases, we’ve found that what needed changing was our own attitude and our own actions, not the people, places, and things around us.
In recovery, we pray for wisdom to know the difference between what can and can’t be changed. Then, once we see the truth of our situation, we pray for the willingness to change ourselves.
 
Just for today: Higher Power, grant me the wisdom to know the difference between what can be changed and what I must accept. Please help me gratefully accept the life I’ve been given.

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